Adrian Page Media - Photography, Audio and Text
Adrian Page Media

Photography

Click on an image to display a larger version.

We have no set price structure - our preference is to establish a working relationship and negotiate a price that both parties are happy with. Please contact us for details.

Declining Sight -DVD _DSC0213 Vultures 1 India File

Tens of millions of vultures used to be present across India, Pakistan and Nepal. Since the early 1990s three vulture species have undergone catastrophic declines. The threatened Vultures - Three vulture species in Asia belonging to the Gyps genus are now critically endangered. These species are the Oriental White-backed Vulture G. bengalensis, Long-billed Vulture G. indicus and Slender-billed Vulture G. tenuirostris.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

In Flight - DVD _DSC0232 Vultures 1 India

The potential loss of these vulture species has profound ecological and social consequences in Asia. Vultures play a vital ecosystem service by rapidly disposing of carcasses that would otherwise pose a risk of disease.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Rapidly Declining - The Egyptian Vulture DVD _DSC0074 Vultures 1 India

Recent surveys have also found that populations of Egyptian vultures Neophron percnopterus and Red-headed vultures Sarcoyps calvus have also undergone rapid population declines in India

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Cause of the Decline - Veterinary Diclofenac and safe alternative Meloxicam_DSC0015

Research has discovered that the major cause of the population decline is Diclofenac, an non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used widely in veterinary medicine across South Asia. Population modelling has shown that less than 1% of carcasses need to contain a lethal quantity of Diclofenac for this drug to be the main, or only, cause of the decline in vulture numbers

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Save Vultures Save Nature - DVD DSC0026 Vultures 1 India File Posters 12

Because of the unprecedented scale and speed of the population declines it is necessary to bring vultures of all three species into captivity to ensure the survival of these species.Captive breeding will enable the numbers of vultures to increase and will eventually allow the release of vultures into the wild.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Vulchers Decline India Environment Box 4 File 7 2m 5

Griffon vultures are extremely effective and efficient scavengers, with a group of these birds being able to reduce an adult cow carcass to bare bones within a matter of minutes.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Vultures Decline Dogs Dinner DVD _DSC0054. Vultures 1 India File

Without as many vultures to dispose of dumped carcasses, there is an abundance of available meat. The result is that vulture declines have been associated with the explosion of feral dog populations across India.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Street Dogs New Delhi - DVD _DSC0158 Vultures 2 Bihar Environment

The potential loss of these vulture species has profound ecological and social consequences in Asia. Vultures play a vital ecosystem service by rapidly disposing of carcasses that would otherwise pose a risk of disease. With the decline of vultures there has been a dramatic increase in feral dog numbers, which pose a real risk to human health and safety.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Street Dogs - DVD _DSC0219 Vultures 2 Bihar Environment

The vulture's declines could see an imapact on public health in India with a marked increase of zoonotic diseases from dogs, rats and livestock carcasses. Their declines also have the potential of creating economic impacts.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

The Egyptian Vulture Another Species Rapidly Declining - DVD _DSC0058

Recent surveys have also found that populations of Egyptian vultures Neophron percnopterus and Red-headed vultures Sarcoyps calvus have also undergone rapid population declines in India (follow link to paper). BirdLife International has classified these two species as globally Endangered and Critically Endangered, respectively.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Verging On Extinction - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0275

Across India the most unprecedented decline of any species on the planet has occurred giving rise to great concern for human health and well being throughout the country. Several species of Gyps vultures are now on the verge of extinction.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Once Millions - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0218

By the late 1980’s the Oriental White-backed vultures were so numerous they were considered the most abundant bird of prey in the world, but today along with two other species, the Long-billed and the Slender-billed vultures their numbers have crashed from well over 40 million birds to a mere few thousand, all largely due to the pain killing ‘wonder drug’ Diclofenac.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Once A Haven For Vultures Nesting - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs_DSC0271

The rocky outcrop was once a haven for vultures especially during the nesting season. Today there are but a few vultures nesting in this vicinity.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Once Upon A Time - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0262_jpg

The rocky outcrop was once a haven for vultures especially during the nesting season. The numbers indicate the number of nests above and the year. Today there are none.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Now The Monkey's Domain - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0160

Once the rocky outcrop was a haven for vultures especially during the nesting season. Today the area has become a haven for monkeys who seem to rule the roost.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Egret Replaces Vanishing Vultures - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0056

Today with the absence of vultures and so many putrefying carcasses there is growing concern for human health and well being across India, not only pollution of air, soil and water but the rise in zoonotic diseases such as rabies.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

A Rare Sight - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs, Box 4 File 7 2m 6

Seventy to eighty vultures would feed on a carcass stripping the flesh clean to the bone in less than twenty minutes. Not today.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Diclofenac Egyptian Vultures Demise - Neophron percnopterus , Reportage, India Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0071

Indications are that the Egyptian and Red-headed vultures are facing a similar fate as they also are declining extremely rapidly”.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Another Species Declining Due To Diclofenac - Egyptian Vulture, Neophron percnopterus , Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0068

Indications are that the Egyptian and Red-headed vultures are facing a similar fate as they also are declining extremely rapidly. Even if veterinary Diclofenac was ‘completely out of the market place’ human Diclofenac is not and proves just as toxic for vultures.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Declining Species - Egyptian Vulture, Neophron percnopterus , Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0074

When many pharmacies from rural areas to New Delhi are still proscribing pain relief for a cow with a limp containing Diclofenac the future for the few remaining vultures would seem extremely bleak indeed. Indications are that the Egyptian and Red-headed vultures are facing a similar fate as they also are declining extremely rapidly

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

In Decline - Reportage, India, Vutures To Street Dogs_DSC0177.jpg

By the late 1980’s the Oriental White-backed vultures were so numerous they were considered the most abundant bird of prey in the world, but today along with two other species, the Long-billed and the Slender-billed vultures their numbers have crashed from well over 40 million birds to a mere few thousand, all largely due to the pain killing ‘wonder drug’ Diclofenac.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Close To Extinction - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0244

Across India the most unprecedented decline of any species on the planet has occurred giving rise to great concern for human health and well being throughout the country. By the late 1980’s the Oriental White-backed vultures were so numerous they were considered the most abundant bird of prey in the world, but today along with two other species, the Long-billed and the Slender-billed vultures their numbers have crashed from well over 40 million birds to a mere few thousand, It was ardent ornithologist Dr Vibhu Prakash, Principle Scientist with Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) who discovered the drastic decline in vultures.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Vultures Domain - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs_DSC0222

It was ardent ornithologist Dr Vibhu Prakash, Principle Scientist with Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) who discovered the drastic decline in vultures. Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) is taking a leading role in the vulture conservation programme which is supported by the Government of India as well as a number of leading international ngo’s such the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, UK.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Vanishing Sight - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs, _DSC0265

Across India the most unprecedented decline of any species on the planet has occurred giving rise to great concern for human health and well being throughout the country. By the late 1980’s the Oriental White-backed vultures were so numerous they were considered the most abundant bird of prey in the world, but today along with two other species, the Long-billed and the Slender-billed vultures their numbers have crashed from well over 40 million birds to a mere few thousand, all largely due to the pain killing ‘wonder drug’ Diclofenac.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Entrance - VCBC, Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0062

The Vulture Conservation Breeding Centre (VCBC) at Pinjore, Haryana is the joint project of Bombay Natural History Society, and the Haryana Forest Department. Vulture Conservation Breeding Centre, (VCBC) was established in September 2001 when it was known as the Vulture Care Centre. It was established by the UK Government’s ‘Darwin Initiative for the survival of species’ fund to investigate the dramatic declines in India’s Gyps species of vultures.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Vulture Concervation Breeding Centre - VCBC, Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0063

Vulture Conservation Breeding Centre, (VCBC) was established in September 2001 when it was known as the Vulture Care Centre. It was established by the UK Government’s ‘Darwin Initiative for the survival of species’ fund to investigate the dramatic declines in India’s Gyps species of vultures. Today it is known that three species are close to extinction and seemingly two other species following in their flight path.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Oriental White Backed Vulure's Aviary, Vulture Conservation And Breeding Centre - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs, _DSC0070

The first Vulture Conservation Breeding Centre was officially opened in 2003 in Haryana State. Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) is taking a leading role in the vulture conservation programme which is supported by the Government of India as well as a number of leading international ngo’s. Chris Bowden is International Species Recovery Officer for the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, UK he also manages the Vulture Recovery Programme in India and Nepal supporting the BNHS and the Government of India.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Nesting Windows - VCBC, Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0076

Each Aviary has been specially designed with the vultures wellbeing in mind. Chris Bowden is International Species Recovery Officer for the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, UK he also manages the Vulture Recovery Programme in India and Nepal supporting the BNHS and the Government of India. “We intend to get 25 breeding pairs of the three species at the centre and our objective is to get six such centres across South Asia”. Chris Bowden spoke positively.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Secluded Vulture's Aviary - VCBC, Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs, _DSC0028

Getting the Birds into the centres is proving a massive challenge because to acquire permission to capture the birds requires immense understanding, co-operation between States and all wildlife and conservation communities. At the VCBC the vulture’s safety and wellbeing is paramount to the extent that photography of these magnificent birds is not allowed.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Vulture's Aviary - VCBC, Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs, _DSC0075

Secluded, quite, peaceful the Vulture Conservation Breeding Centre is established in an ideal environment for the care of the vultures.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Aviary Protective Screen - VCBC, Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0080

Bamboo is used on the Aviaries as a protective screen to shield, the vultures from any distraction beyond the Aviary.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Vultures Food Goat Diclofenac Free - VCBC, Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs, _DSC0047

Vultures are fed on ‘Diclofenac free’ goat meat. This is not a cheap commodity, but the health of the few remaining vultures is paramount.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Food For Vultures, Goat Diclofenac Free - VCBC, Reportage, Vultures To Street Dogs _DSC0051

Vultures are fed on ‘Diclofenac free’ goat meat. This is not a cheap commodity, but the health of the few remaining vultures is paramount. By the late 1980’s the Oriental White-backed vultures were so numerous they were considered the most abundant bird of prey in the world, but today along with two other species, the Long-billed and the Slender-billed vultures their numbers have crashed from well over 40 million birds to a mere few thousand, all largely due to the pain killing ‘wonder drug’ Diclofenac.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Lab. And Nestling Aviary - VCBC, Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs, _DSC0046

The Vulture Conservation Breeding Centre (VCBC) at Pinjore, Haryana is the joint project of Bombay Natural History Society, and the Haryana Forest Department. The Centre has many purpose built Aviaries including a Nursery Aviary for young vultures that arrive at the Vulture Conservation Breeding Centre.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Analysing - VCBC Dr Vibhu Prakash - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs, _DSC0041

The VCBC has a well equipped laboratory which enables a variety of procedures to be conducted. The Vulture Conservation Breeding Centre (VCBC) at Pinjore, Haryana is the joint project of Bombay Natural History Society, and the Haryana Forest Department. It was ardent ornithologist Dr Vibhu Prakash, Principle Scientist with Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) who discovered the drastic decline in vultures.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

In The Laboratory - VCBC Dr Vibhu Prakash and Chris Bowden, Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs, _DSC0037

The VCBC has a well equipped laboratory which enables a variety of procedures to be conducted. Chris Bowden is International Species Recovery Officer for the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, UK he also manages the Vulture Recovery Programme in India and Nepal supporting the BNHS and the Government of India. Dr Vibhu Prakash, is Principle Scientist with Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) who discovered the drastic decline in vultures.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Partners - VCBC, Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0065

Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) is taking a leading role in the vulture conservation programme as well as a number of leading international ngo’s which imclude:- Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, UK, and the Zoological Society of London,

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Feral Dogs Replace Vultures - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs, Box 4 File 6 r ns 5 35

India has one of the largest head of livestock in the world, well over 500 million. Today with the absence of vultures and so many putrefying carcasses there is growing concern for human health and well being across India, not only pollution of air, soil and water but the rise in zoonotic diseases such as rabies.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Health And Wellbeing - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0034

“Over 50% of deaths due to rabies occur in India, more than 25 000 case annually”. Revealed WHO’s Technical Officer for Veterinary Public Health. “The high mortality rate is due to street dogs, they are out of control particularly in the urban areas where the ratio of dogs to humans is five to one’.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

New Delhi Street Dogs An Increasing Concern - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0159

“Over 50% of deaths due to rabies occur in India, more than 25 000 case annually”. Revealed WHO’s Technical Officer for Veterinary Public Health. “The high mortality rate is due to street dogs, they are out of control particularly in the urban areas where the ratio of dogs to humans is five to one’.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Increase In Street Dogs A Growing Threat To Human Health And Wellbeing - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs, DSC_0207

Today with the absence of vultures and so many putrefying carcasses there is growing concern for human health and well being across India, not only pollution of air, soil and water but the rise in zoonotic diseases such as rabies. “Over 50% of deaths due to rabies occur in India, more than 25 000 case annually”. Revealed WHO’s Technical Officer for Veterinary Public Health.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Street Dogs New Delhi - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0160

“Over 50% of deaths due to rabies occur in India, more than 25 000 case annually”. Revealed WHO’s Technical Officer for Veterinary Public Health. “The high mortality rate is due to street dogs, they are out of control particularly in the urban areas where the ratio of dogs to humans is five to one’. “An awareness campaign is really required to educate the people who are suffering largely due to ignorance and negligence”.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Cause For Concern - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0044

Today with the absence of vultures and so many putrefying carcasses there is growing concern for human health and well being across India, not only pollution of air, soil and water but the rise in zoonotic diseases such as rabies.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Street Dog - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0212

The rapid decline of vultures has given rise to increasing numbers of street dogs. “Over 50% of deaths due to rabies occur in India, more than 25 000 case annually”. Revealed WHO’s Technical Officer for Veterinary Public Health. “The high mortality rate is due to street dogs, they are out of control particularly in the urban areas where the ratio of dogs to humans is five to one’.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Street Dogs A Concern - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs,_DSC0170

The decline in the vulture population has opened the door to an explosion of street dogs and an increase in zoomotic diseases such as rabies.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >

Street Dogs A Threat To Human Health And Wellbeing - Reportage, India, Vultures To Street Dogs_DSC0218_

The decline in the vulture population has opened the door to an explosion of street dogs and an increase in zoomotic diseases such as rabies. “Over 50% of deaths due to rabies occur in India, more than 25 000 case annually”. Revealed WHO’s Technical Officer for Veterinary Public Health. “The high mortality rate is due to street dogs, they are out of control particularly in the urban areas where the ratio of dogs to humans is five to one’.

View large image > >

Enquire about this image > >