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African Elephants at Watering Hole - Box 1 File 1 Africa Kenya m1 18 Fauna

African Elephant Loxodonta africana. Male elephants are known as ‘bulls’ and the females as ‘cows’ They have no sweat glands, so they cool off by rolling in ponds and streams. The mud that dries on their skin protects it from the sun. African elephants range south of the Sahara. Elephants life span compares to that of human beings. An elephant’s trunk is boneless. It is actually a very elongated upper lip and nose which they use to transfer food such as grasses, leaves, roots, fruits, also water to their mouth. The trunk is also used to trumpet calls and draw up dust for dust bathing. Elephant’s s ears are not just for hearing and visual communication they can flap them in order to circulate the air and cool down.

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Herd of African Elephants - Box 1 File 1 Africa Kenya m1 17 Fauna

African Elephant Loxodonta africana. Male elephants are known as ‘bulls’ and the females as ‘cows’ They have no sweat glands, so they cool off by rolling in ponds and streams. The mud that dries on their skin protects it from the sun. African elephants range south of the Sahara. Elephants life span compares to that of human beings. An elephant’s trunk is boneless. It is actually a very elongated upper lip and nose which they use to transfer food such as grasses, leaves, roots, fruits, also water to their mouth. The trunk is also used to trumpet calls and draw up dust for dust bathing.

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African Elephant - Head On - Africa Box 1 File 1 10m 10 Fauna

The setting sun creates a warm glow over the juvenile African elephant. African Elephant Loxodonta africana. Male elephants are known as ‘bulls’ and the females as ‘cows’ They have no sweat glands, so they cool off by rolling in ponds and streams. The mud that dries on their skin protects it from the sun. African elephants range south of the Sahara, Elephants life span compares to that of human beings An elephant’s trunk is boneless. It is actually a very elongated upper lip and nose which they use to transfer food such as grasses, leaves, roots, fruits, also water to their mouth. The trunk is also used to trumpet calls and draw up dust for dust bathing. Being a highly sensitive organ it enables elephants to analyse air borne scents that may indicate a source of food or potential danger. This is often the case when elephants are seen with their trunks raised in the air. Elephant’s s ears are not just for hearing and visual communication they can flap them in order to circulate the air and cool down. The location of their small eyes on their large head which does not move to that extent renders them with poor eyesight.

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African Elephant - Ear and Eye - Africa Box 1 File 1 10m 12 Fauna

The setting sun helps to create a warmth to the image African Elephant - Loxodonta africana. Male elephants are known as ‘bulls’ and the females as ‘cows’ African elephants range south of the Sahara whilst the smaller Indian elephants, Elephas maximus, reside in India and the south-eastern Asia region. Elephants life span compares to that of human beings. Elephant’s s ears are not just for hearing and visual communication they can flap them in order to circulate the air and cool down. The location of their small eyes on their large head which does not move to that extent renders them with poor eyesight.

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African Elephant - Anyone For Polo - Africa Box 1 File 1 10m 4 Fauna

African Elephant - Loxodonta africana. Male elephants are known as ‘bulls’ and the females as ‘cows’ African elephants range south of the Sahara, The smaller Indian elephants, Elephas maximus, reside in India and the south-eastern Asia region. The elephants life span compares to that of human beings. An elephant’s trunk is boneless. It is actually a very elongated upper lip and nose which they use to transfer food such as grasses, leaves, roots, fruits, also water to their mouth. The trunk is also used to trumpet calls and draw up dust for dust bathing. Being a highly sensitive organ it enables elephants to analyse air borne scents that may indicate a source of food or potential danger. This is often the case when elephants are seen with their trunks raised in the air. By means of finger-like lobes at the end of the trunk and with a sucking action of the two nostrils elephants can pick up and examining small objects. As with most juvrniles they enjoy to play and African elephants are no exception and are quick to learn a variety of skills.

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Black Winged Stilts -Take Off - Box 4 India File 6 ns5 28 Fauna

Black Winged Stilts Himantopus himantiopus They are unmistakable medium-large wader with seemingly ridiculously long gangly legs which enable them to feed in deeper water than many other waders.

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Brihminy Kite - In Flight - Box 4 India File 7 ns 6 32 Chilika Fauna

Brihminy Kite - Haliastur indus Is a large very distinctive kite. Its habitat is usually close to water, coastal regions, mangroves, inlets and harbours.

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Brihminy Kite - Inflight Feeding - Box 4 India File 7 ns 6 29 Chilika Fauna

Brihminy Kite - Haliastur indus With their habitat being close to water their diet consists largely of fish.

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Brihminy Kite - Feeding in Flight - Box 4 India File 7 ns 6 28 Chilika Fauna

Brihminy Kite - Haliastur indus To a large extent their diet consists of fish hence their habit tends to be within close proximity of water especially coastal regions.

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Osprey - Survival 1 - DSC_0476

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus. Osprey are about 60 cm (24 in) long. They are sometimes called fish hawk or fish eagle. When searching for food Osprey hover over water before diving beneath the surface to capture fish in their talons. Osprey can be heard to have a thin, shrill like whistle.

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Osprey - 3 Alighting - DSC_0558 - 377

Osprey Pandion haliaetus. Osprey are about 60 cm (24 in) long. They are sometimes called fish hawk or fish eagle. Osprey can be heard to have a thin, shrill like whistle. Ospreys were once common in northern Europe and along the Atlantic coastal regions of North America. Over the years Osprey numbers have drastically reduced particularly in Europe and along the Atlantic coastal fringe of North America due to shooting, egg collecting, and in particular when DDT and other pesticide residues the Osprey ingested from the food they ate which had a knock on effect with their reproductive system. Since the subsequent banning of these chemicals Osprey numbers have been slowly increasing in recent years. Especially in England where a recovery programme is proving to be successful.

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Osprey - Ever Alert - 355

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus. Osprey are about 60 cm (24 in) long. They are sometimes called fish hawk or fish eagle. They build large nests of twigs in tall trees. Being migratory birds they often return to breed in the same nests.

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2 Osprey - With Power - 366

Osprey Pandion haliaetus. Osprey are about 60 cm (24 in) long. They are sometimes called fish hawk or fish eagle. They build large nests of twigs in tall trees; but are also known to utilise platforms erected to keep them from nesting on power poles. If there is no purpose built platform then they will nest on the power pole itself. Being migratory birds they often return to breed in the same nests.

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4 Osprey - Over Powered - 368

Osprey Pandion haliaetus. Osprey are about 60 cm (24 in) long. They are sometimes called fish hawk or fish eagle. They build large nests of twigs in tall trees; but are also known to utilise platforms erected to keep them from nesting on power poles. If there is no purpose built platform then they will nest on the power pole itself. Being migratory birds they often return to breed in the same nests.

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Sulphur Crested Cockatoo - Watchful - Box 1 Australia Fauna File 2 ns 7 4a

The Sulphur-Crested Cockatoo Cacatua galerita Is related to the parakeets, parrots, lorikeets, and macaws. This species is most easily distinguished from other members of the family by its brilliantly white plumage and yellow crest. Cockatoo, common name for 17 species of birds in the parrot family, found in Australia, the East Indies, and the Philippines. All cockatoos have erectile feathered crests and powerful hooked beaks. Most species are white, but some are grey, pink, or black, with bright markings. The Sulphur Crested Cockatoos are particularly popular cage birds.

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Sulphur-Crested Cockatoo Feeding - Box 1 Australia Fauna File 2 ns 6 2a

The Sulphur-Crested Cockatoo Cacatua galerita Is related to the parakeets, parrots, lorikeets, and macaws. 'Cockatoo' is the common name for 17 species of birds in the parrot family. They are found in Australia, the East Indies, and the Philippines. The body size of most species lies between 30 and 52 cm (12 and 20 in. They tend to live communally and in the wild Cockatoos feed on vegetation, sometimes damaging crops. The Sulphur-Crested Cockatoo are particularly popular cage birds

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Sulphur Crested Cockatoo - Food in Hand - Box 1 Australia Fauna File 2 Australia ns 6 8a

The Sulphur-Crested Cockatoo Cacatua galerita Is related to the parakeets, parrots, lorikeets, and macaws. This species is most easily distinguished from other members of the family by its brilliantly white plumage and yellow crest. The body size of most species lies between 30 and 52 cm (12 and 20 in). In the wild, Cockatoos feed on vegetation, and can be very distructive damaging crops etc. Being intelligent and quite docile as well as being capable of mimicking human speech, cockatoos are popular cage birds. The Sulphur-Crested Cockatoos are particularly popular cage birds

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Emerald Spotted Tree Frog - Resting _DSC0069 Australia Enviro Fauna

Emerald Spotted Tree Frog Litoria peroni

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Emerald Spotted Tree Frog - In Full _DSC0057 Australia Enviro Fauna

Emerald Spotted Tree Frog Litoria peroni

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Emerald Spotted Tree Frog - Peeping _DSC0097 Australia Enviro Fauna

Emerald Spotted Tree Frog Litoria peroni

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Emerald Spotted Tree Frog - The Eye _DSC0067 Australia Enviro Fauna

Emerald Spotted Tree Frog Litoria peroni

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Carpet Python - 1 Digestion - Box 1 File 2 Australia Fauna ns 6 9

Carpet Python - Morelia spilota variegata. Digesting is kill. This reptile is by and large nocturnal, but it can be found active or resting during the daytime. Carpet Pythons eat mammals, but do also consume birds and other reptiles. Although pythons do not have any venom, they constrict their prey instead, Carpet Pythons expel a load hiss when provoked and they have no reluctance to bite even humans.

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Carpet Python - 2 Digestion - Box 1 File 2 Australia Fauna ns 6 8

Carpet Python - Morelia spilota variegata This reptile is by and large nocturnal, but it can be found active or resting during the daytime. Carpet Pythons usually eat mammals, but do also consume birds and other reptiles. Although pythons do not have any venom, they constrict their prey instead, Carpet Pythons expel a load hiss when provoked and they have no reluctance to bite even humans. This image is a close-up view of Carpet Python digesting a recent kill

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Carpet Python - Resting Place 1 - Box 6 File A Australia Fauna ns H2 25

Carpet Python - Morelia spilota variegata This species of python is quite widespread in eastern areas of Australia from semi arid inland regions to rainforests. It is by and large nocturnal, but it can be found active or resting during the daytime' This Carpet Python found resting high up in a Stag Horn whch is attached to a tree.

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Carpet Python - Resting Place 2 - Box 6 File A Australia Fauna ns H2 26

Carpet Python - Morelia spilota variegata This species of python is quite widespread in eastern areas of Australia from semi arid inland regions to rainforests. It is by and large nocturnal, but it can be found active or resting during the daytime. Although Carpet Pythons usually eats mammals they do also consume birds and other reptiles. This image reveals a Carpet Python having a rest in a Stag Horn which is attached high up in a tree.

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Carpet Python - Resting Place 4 - Box 6 File A Australia Fauna ns H1 29

Carpet Python - Morelia spilota variegata This species of python is quite widespread in eastern areas of Australia from semi arid inland regions to rainforests. The Carpet Python is by and large nocturnal, but it can be found active or resting during the daytime. This image shows a Carpet Python resting safely high up in a Stag Horn.

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Carpet Python - Waiting Game - Box 6 File A Australia Fauna ns H1 35

Carpet Python - Morelia spilota variegata This species of python is quite widespread in eastern areas of Australia from semi arid inland regions to rainforests. This reptile is by and large nocturnal, but it can be found active or resting during the daytime. Carpet Pythons usually eat mammals, but do also consume birds and other reptiles. Although pythons do not have any venom, they constrict their prey instead, Carpet Pythons expel a load hiss when provoked and they have no reluctance to bite even humans.

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Carpet Python - Natures Creation - Box 6 File A Australia Fauna ns H2 10 a

Carpet Python - Morelia spilota variegata This species of python is quite widespread in eastern areas of Australia from semi arid inland regions to rainforests and they do vary in colour and design. This reptile is by and large nocturnal, but it can be found active or resting during the daytime. Carpet Pythons usually eat mammals, but do also consume birds and other reptiles. Although pythons do not have any venom, they constrict their prey instead, Carpet Pythons expel a load hiss when provoked and they have no reluctance to bite even humans. This image reveals natures creation of the Carpet Python's scaley skin

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1 Cane Toad - In the Garden - Box 1 Australia Fauna File 2 ns 5 27

Although the Cane Toad’s native habitat extends from the southern United States to tropical South America they have reached almost plague proportions in many locations in Australia especially in the state of Queensland and the Northern Territory In 1935 they were introduced from Hawaii to Australia in order to control cane beetles that were affecting the sugarcane there. But the Cane Toad’s insatiable appetite failed to limit the number of beetles. Instead they turned their attention on consuming an enormous variety of Australia’s wildlife thus becoming a pest themselves. Cane toads are having a dramatic affect on Australia’s native wildlife by eating small animals and poisoning larger predators that try to eat them. Household pets are also at risk from poisoning. Cane Toads have few predators in Australia. To date there is no known way to control the spread of Cane toads.

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4 Cane Toad - Box 1 Australia Fauna File 2 ns 6 1

Cane Toad, Bufo marinus, is one of the largest toads of the Bufo genus. On average adults grow to between 10-15 cm long, although the largest female measured in Queensland was 24 cm long and weighed in at 1.3 kg. The Cane Toad is tough and adaptable as well as being poisonous throughout its life cycle. It has few predators in Australia and is badly affecting competing native amphibians.

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6 Cane Toad - Box 1 Australia Fauna File 2 ns6 6

Cane Toad, Bufo marinus They have a bony head and over their eyes are bony ridges that meet above the nose.

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8 Cane Toad - Parotoid Glands Box 1 Australia Fauna File 2 ns 5 32

Cane Toad, Bufo marinus. These amphibians have a dry warty skin. Adults have large swellings, parotoid glands, on each shoulder which produce a highly affective venom.

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9 Cane Toad - Box 1 Australia Fauna File 2 ns 5 37a

Cane Toad, Bufo marinus.

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10 Cane Toad - Box 1 Australia Fauna File 2 ns 8 1

Cane Toad, Bufo marinus.

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14 Cane Toad - Box 1 Australia Fauna File 2 ns 6 18

Cane Toad, Bufo marinus. They sit upright and move in short rapid hops. When attacked a Cane Toad will turn one of its parotoid glands towards its assailant. The venom will either seep out of the glands or the toad can squirt a fine spray for a short distance. This toxin proves fatal to a vast variety fauna that comes in contact with it including freshwtaer crocodiles, snakes, birds and dogs. For humans it may cause intense pain and inflamation even temporary blindness.

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17 Cane Toad - Box 1 Australia Fauna File 2 ns 5 31

Cane Toad, Bufo marinus.

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20 Cane Toad - Box 1 Australia Fauna File 2 ns6 6 a

Cane Toad, Bufo marinus They have a bony head and over their eyes are bony ridges that meet above the nose.

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Farm Cat Fauna UK Box 2 File 5 m 3 16

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Mute Swan on Nest 1 - Fauna UK Box 2 File 5 m1 1

Mute Swan - Cygnus olor Mute Swans grow to about 1.5 m (5 ft) tall and weighs up to 13.5 kg (30 lb). Its native habitat was the eastern hemisphere, but today they can be found across much of Europe and North America. Male Mute Swans, the cob and the female, the pen, usually choose their mate when they are two or three years old and they mate for life which can be for up to about 35 years. Pens lay three to seven eggs which take about 30 to 35 days to incubate. She will defend these from any threat without fear – head retracted and wings out spread to frighten any aggressor. Although called ‘Mute’ swans, due to being the least vocal of all the swan species, when angry they expel a load hiss

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Mute Swan on Nest 2 - Fauna UK Box 2 File 5 m1 2

Mute swan - Cygnus olor They construct large nests usually in the close locality of ponds or marshes. By and large their diet consists of underwater plants and grasses found along the shoreline.

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Mute Swan Feeding - Fauna UK Box 2 File 5 m1 19

Mute Swan - Cygnus olor, By and large their diet consists of underwater plants and grasses found along the shoreline.

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Mute Swan Cob Pen and Cygnets - Fauna UK Box 2 File 5 m1 20

Mute Swan - Cygnus olor Swans, the male or cob and the female, the pen, usually choose their mate when they are two or three years old and they mate for life which can be up to about 35 years. Even though it may take young swans , cygnets, 7 to 14 weeks to learn how to fly they often remain with their parents several year until they find a mate.

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Mute Swan and Cygnets - Fauna UK Box 2 File 5 m 2 4

Mute Swan - Cygnus olor Swan’s graceful movement through water has inspired many people over the centuries especially in terms of creating literature and music. Mute swans grow to about 1.5 metres, or 5 feet, tall and weigh up to 13.5 kilograms, 30 pounds. Although called ‘Mute’ swans, due to being the least vocal of all the swan species, when angry they expel a load hiss. Even though it may take young swans, cygnets, 7 to 14 weeks to learn how to fly they often remain with their parents several year until they find a mate.

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Mute Swan and Cygnets - Fauna UK Box 2 File 5 m 2 7

Mute Swan - Cygnus olor Even though it may take young swans, cygnets, 7 to 14 weeks to learn how to fly they often remain with their parents several year until they find a mate.

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Mute Swan Cygnets - Fauna UK Box 2 File 5 m 2 2

Mute Swan - Cygnus olor Swans, the male or cob and the female, the pen, usually choose their mate when they are two or three years old and they mate for life which can be up to about 35 years. Even though it may take young swans, cygnets, 7 to 14 weeks to learn how to fly they often remain with their parents several year until they find a mate.

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Mute Swan 1 - Fauna UK Box 2 File 5 m1 4

Mute Swan - Cygnus olor Mute Swans are native birds of northern and central Eurasia. They were introduced into North America where today they are well established in many areas.

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Mute Swan 3 - Fauna UK Box 2 File 5 m1 7

Mute Swan - Cygnus olor Swan’s graceful movement through water has inspired many people over the centuries especially in terms of creating literature and music. Mute swans grow to about 1.5 metres, or 5 feet, tall and weigh up to 13.5 kilograms, 30 pounds. Mute Swans are native birds of northern and central Eurasia. Having been introduced into North America today they are well established in many areas.

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Mute Swan 6 - Fauna UK Box 2 File 5 m1 10

Mute Swan - Cygnus olor Mute swans are to be found in parks and country estates as well as in the wild. They can be found living in well-sheltered bays, open marshes, lakes, and ponds.

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Mute Swan Highlights 14 - Fauna UK Box 2 File 5 m1 16

Mute Swan - Cygnus olor By and large their diet consists of underwater plants and grasses found along the shoreline. Mute swans can be found in parks and country estates as well as in the wild. They can be found living in well-sheltered bays, open marshes, lakes, and ponds.

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Mute Swan 9 - Fauna UK Box 2 File 5 m1 13

Mute Swan - Cygnus olor Mute swans grow to about 1.5 metres, or 5 feet, tall and weigh up to 13.5 kilograms, 30 pounds. Mute Swans are native birds of northern and central Eurasia. They were introduced into North America where today they are well established in many areas. Mute swans can be found in parks and country estates as well as in the wild. They can be found living in well-sheltered bays, open marshes, lakes, and ponds.

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Mute Swan 7 - Fauna UK Box 2 File 5 m1 11

Mute Swan - Cygnus olor Swans, the male or cob and the female, the pen, usually choose their mate when they are two or three years old and they mate for life which can be up to about 35 years.

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Rookery 4 - Fauna UK Box 2 File 5 m 2 15

Rook - Corvus frugilegus Rooks build their nests high up in trees in a colony called a rookery. Rooks build their nest from twigs wqhich are twigs bound together with earth and lined with various items such as moss, leaves, grass, etc.

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Rookery 2 - Fauna UK Box 2 File 5 m 2 13

Rook Corvus frugilegus Rooks build their nests high up in trees in a colony called a ‘rookery’. Rooks build their nest from twigs wqhich are twigs bound together with earth and lined with various items such as moss, leaves, grass, etc. Rooks often return to their previous years nests which they may renovated before reusing them.

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Bulls Nose Flies - Fauna UK Box 2 File 5 m 3 18

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Insects on Ragwort - Fauna UK Box 2 File 5 m 3 6

Ragwort - Senecio jacobaea Linnaeus Ragwort is native to Europe and Western Asia, but is now found elsewhere such as Australia. Ragwort is an invasive pasture weed which can be poisonous to grazing animals. But they are a major attraction to a variety of insects.

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Australian Pelican 1 _DSC0012. - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Australian Pelican - Pelecanus conspicillatus

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Australian Pelican _DSC0248.. Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Australian Pelican - Pelecanus conspicillatus

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Australian Pelican _DSC0256.. Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Australian Pelican - Pelecanus conspicillatus

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Australian Pelican _DSC0291. Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Australian Pelican - Pelecanus conspicillatus

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Australian Black Swan _DSC0168 - Fauna Australian Birds 1

Black Swan - Cygnus atratus

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Australian Black Swan _DSC0094. - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Black Swan - Cygnus atratus

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Australian Black Swan _DSC0100 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Black Swan - Cygnus atratus

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Australian Black Swan Cygnet 1 _DSC0096

Black Swan - Cygnus atratus After hatching the young swans or cygnets are looked after by the adult male, cob and female, pen, swans for about 6 months.

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Australian Black Swan Cygnets 3 _DSC0104 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Black Swan - Cygnus atratus After hatching the young swans or cygnets are looked after by the adult male, cob and female, pen, swans for about 6 months.

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Australian Black Swan Cygnets 4 _DSC0105 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Black Swan - Cygnus atratus After hatching the young swans or cygnets are looked after by the adult male, cob and female, pen, swans for about 6 months.

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Australian Black Swans with Cygnets 3 _DSC0198 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Black Swan - Cygnus atratus After hatching the young swans or cygnets are looked after by the adult male, cob and female, pen, swans for about 6 months.

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Australian Black Swans and Cygnets 9 _DSC0149 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Black Swan - Cygnus atratus After hatching the young swans or cygnets are looked after by the adult male, cob and female, pen, swans for about 6 months.

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Australian Black Swan and Cygnet 6 _DSC0209 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Black Swan - Cygnus atratus After hatching the young swans or cygnets are looked after by the adult male, cob and female, pen, swans for about 6 months.

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Australian Black Swan and Cygent 5 _DSC0200 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Black Swan - Cygnus atratus After hatching the young swans or cygnets are looked after by the adult male, cob and female, pen, swans for about 6 months.

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Australian Black Swan and Cygnet 12 _DSC0167- Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Black Swan - Cygnus atratus After hatching the young swans or cygnets are looked after by the adult male, cob and female, pen, swans for about 6 months.

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Brahminy Kite in Flight 1 _DSC0003 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Brahminy Kite - Haliastur indus

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Brahminy Kite Attack _DSC0010 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Brahminy Kite - Haliastur indus

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Brahminy Kite Attack 2 _DSC0009 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Brahminy Kite - Haliastur indus

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Bri Kite Resting _DSC0019 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Brahminy Kite - Haliastur indus

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Brahminy Kite Diving _DSC0244 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Brahminy Kite - Haliastur indus

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Brahminy Kite Hunting _DSC0245 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Brahminy Kite - Haliastur indus

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Dusky Moorhen _DSC0207 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Dusky Moorhen - Gallinula tenebrosa

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Dusky Moorhen Dives for Food _DSC0254 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Dusky Moorhen - Gallinula tenebrosa

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Dusky Moorhens Fedding _DSC0137 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Dusky Moorhen - Gallinula tenebrosa

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Dusky Moorhens in Combat 1 _DSC0118 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Dusky Moorhen - Gallinula tenebrosa

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Dusky Moorhens in Combat 2 _DSC0122 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Dusky Moorhen - Gallinula tenebrosa

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Dusky Moorhens in Combat 3 _DSC0123 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Dusky Moorhen - Gallinula tenebrosa

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Dusky Moorhens in Combat 4 _DSC0126 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Dusky Moorhen - Gallinula tenebrosa

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Dusky Moorhens in Combat 5 _DSC0129.- Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Dusky Moorhen - Gallinula tenebrosa

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Eurasian Coot _DSC0245 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Eurasian Coot - Fulica atra

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Eurasian Coot _DSC0204 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Eurasian Coot - Fulica atra

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Eurasian Coot _DSC0236 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Eurasian Coot - Fulica atra

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Eurasian Coot Surfaces With Food _DSC0239 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Eurasian Coot - Fulica atra

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Eurasian Coot Feeding 1 _DSC0227 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Eurasian Coot - Fulica atra

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Eurasian Coot Feeding 4 _DSC0242 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Eurasian Coot - Fulica atra

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Eurasian Coot Feeding 3 _DSC0240 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Eurasian Coot - Fulica atra

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Silver Gulls _DSC0198. - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD.

Silver Gulls - Larus novaehollandiae

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Silver Gull in Flight 2 _DSC0201 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD.

Silver Gull - Larus novaehollandiae

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Silver Gull on Tightrope. - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD.

Silver Gull - Larus novaehollandiae

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Silver Gull - Juvenile _DSC0128. - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD.

Silver Gull - Larus novaehollandiae

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Silver Gull Feeding 1 _DSC0210. - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD.

Silver Gull - Larus novaehollandiae

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Silver Gull Feeding 2 _DSC0205 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD.

Silver Gull - Larus novaehollandiae

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Australian White Ibis in Flight 173 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Australian White Ibis - Threskiornis molucca

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Australian White Ibis in Flight 316 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Australian White Ibis - Threskiornis molucca

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Australian White Ibis in Flight 315 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Australian White Ibis - Threskiornis molucca

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Osprey's Nest 2 _DSC0013.- Fauna Osprey 2 DVD - Mangroves 2

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus

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Osprey's Nest 1 _DSC0009.- Fauna Osprey 2 DVD - Mangroves 2

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus

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Osprey at Nest _DSC0007.- Fauna Osprey 2 DVD - Mangroves 2

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus

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Osprey Returns to Nest - DSC_1068.- Fauna Osprey 2 DVD - Mangroves 1

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus

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Osprey at Nest 1 - DSC_1201.- Fauna Osprey 2 DVD - Mangroves 1

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus

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Osprey at Nest 5 -DSC_1202.- Fauna Osprey 2 DVD - Mangroves 1

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus

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Osprey at Nest 4 - DSC_1206 - Fauna Osprey 2 DVD - Mangroves 1

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus

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Osprey Returns with Fish - DSC_1229.- Fauna Osprey 2 DVD - Mangroves 3

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus

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Osprey's Nest 4 - DSC_1215 - Fauna Osprey 2 DVD - Mangroves 3

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus

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Osprey and Juvenile 1 DSC_1132 - Fauna Osprey 2 DVD - Mangroves 1

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus A young Osprey flexes its wings whilst waiting for its next feed.

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Osprey at Nest Site Juvenile 2 DSC_1512 - Fauna Osprey 2 DVD - Mangroves 4

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus A young Osprey flexes its wings whilst waiting for its next feed.

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Osprey at Nest Site 1 DSC_1414 - Fauna Osprey 2 DVD - Mangroves 4

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus Osprey are sometimes called fish hawk or fish eagle. They grow to about 60 cm or 24 inches in length. Osprey build large nests of twigs high up in tall trees; but they will also utilise platforms erected to keep them from nesting on power poles. That being said If there is no purpose built platform they will nest on the power poles. Osprey often return to breed in the same nests year after year.

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Osprey at Nest Site 2 DSC_1411 - Fauna Osprey 2 DVD - Mangroves 4

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus Osprey are sometimes called fish hawk or fish eagle. Osprey build large nests of twigs high up in tall trees; but they will also utilise platforms erected to keep them from nesting on power poles. That being said If there is no purpose built platform they will nest on the power poles. Osprey often return to breed in the same nests year after year.

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Ospreys at Nest Site 4 DSC_1388 - Fauna Osprey 2 DVD - Mangroves 4

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus Osprey grow to about 60 cm or 24 inches in length. Osprey build large nests of twigs high up in tall trees; but they will also utilise platforms erected to keep them from nesting on power poles. That being said If there is no purpose built platform they will nest on the power poles. Osprey often return to breed in the same nests year after year.

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Osprey at Nest Site Communicating DSC_1417 - Fauna Osprey 2 DVD - Mangroves 4

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus Osprey are sometimes called fish hawk or fish eagle. They grow to about 60 cm or 24 inches in length. Osprey build large nests of twigs high up in tall trees; but they will also utilise platforms erected to keep them from nesting on power poles. That being said If there is no purpose built platform they will nest on the power poles. Osprey often return to breed in the same nests year after year. Osprey can be heard to have a thin, shrill like whistle.

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Osprey at Nest Site Harassment 1 DSC_1471 - Fauna Osprey 2 DVD - Mangroves 4

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus Being harassed by a group flock of Blue-faced Honeyeaters - Entomyzon cyanotis Osprey build large nests of twigs high up in tall trees; but they will also utilise platforms erected to keep them from nesting on power poles. That being said If there is no purpose built platform they will nest on the power poles. Osprey often return to breed in the same nests year after year.

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Osprey at Nest Site Harassment 5 DSC_1478.- Fauna Osprey 2 DVD - Mangroves 4

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus Being harassed by a group flock of Blue-faced Honeyeaters - Entomyzon cyanotis Osprey build large nests of twigs high up in tall trees; but they will also utilise platforms erected to keep them from nesting on power poles. That being said If there is no purpose built platform they will nest on the power poles. Osprey often return to breed in the same nests year after year.

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Osprey at Nest Site Harassment 7 DSC_1486 - Fauna Osprey 2 DVD - Mangroves 4

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus An Osprey being harassed by a Blue-faced Honeyeaters - Entomyzon cyanotis decides to flex its might. Osprey build large nests of twigs high up in tall trees; but they will also utilise platforms erected to keep them from nesting on power poles. That being said If there is no purpose built platform they will nest on the power poles. Osprey often return to breed in the same nests year after year.

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Brahminy Kite at Twilight _DSC0247 - Fauna Australian Birds 1 DVD

Brahminy Kite - Haliastur indus

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Harassment Osprey at Nest Site - 6 DSC_1479 - Fauna Osprey 2 DVD - Mangroves 4

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus. Ospreys build large nests of sticks in tall trees. They will also utilise elevated platforms erected to keep them from nesting on adjacent power poles and in some case build their nest on the power pole. Thet return from winter migration to breed in the same nests for many years.

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Together - Hardhead Duck Aythya australis - Fauna Australia_DSC0114

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Pondering - Hardhead Duck Aythya australis - Fauna Australia_DSC0116

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Turbulence - Hardhead Duck Aythya australis - Fauna Australia_DSC0189

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Reflection - Hardhead Duck Aythya australis - Fauna Australia_DSC0191

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Reflecting - Hardhead Duck Aythya australis - Fauna Australia_DSC0190

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1 Camp In Mangroves - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Australia_DSC0160

Flying Fox roost in large colonies which are called ‘camps’.

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3 Roosting - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Australia_DSC0203

Brisbane is the only city in Australia that supports 3 species of Flying Fox.

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4 Home - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Australia_DSC0190

Mangroves are a favourite haunt for Flying Fox bats.

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5 Nocturnal - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Australia_DSC0170

Flying Fox bats are great pollinators especially those native hardwood species that produce nectar and pollen at night time.

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6 Good Days Sleep - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Australia_DSC0163

Flying Fox bats important for dispersing the seeds of many native trees. Unlike birds which tend to drop seeds close by Flying Fox bats disperse the seeds much further a field.

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7 In Camp - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Australia_DSC0155

Flying Fox roost in large colonies which are called ‘camps’.

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8 Upside Down - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Australia_DSC0159

Brisbane is the only city in Australia that supports 3 species of Flying Fox. Flying Fox bats are great pollinators especially those native hardwood species that produce nectar and pollen at night time.

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11 In The Camp - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Australia_DSC0164

Flying Fox bats are great pollinators especially those native hardwood species that produce nectar and pollen at night time. They are also important for dispersing the seeds of many native trees. Unlike birds which tend to drop seeds close by Flying Fox bats disperse the seeds much further a field.

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12 Over The Camp - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Australia_DSC0187

The Grey-headed Flying Fox have a wingspan of over 1 meter.

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14 Landing - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Australia_DSC0197

Flying Fox roost in large colonies which are called ‘camps’. The Grey headed Flying Fox have a wingspan of over 1 meter.

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15 Tafe Off - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Australia_DSC0198

Brisbane is the only city in Australia that supports 3 species of Flying Fox. Flying Fox roost in large colonies which are called ‘camps’.

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16 Inflight - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Australia_DSC0192

The Grey headed Flying Fox have a wingspan of over 1 meter. Flying Fox bats are important for dispersing the seeds of many native trees. Unlike birds which tend to drop seeds close by Flying Fox bats disperse the seeds much further a field.

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17 Coming Into Camp - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Australia_DSC0183

Flying Fox bats are important for dispersing the seeds of many native trees. Unlike birds which tend to drop seeds close by Flying Fox bats disperse the seeds much further a field. They are also great pollinators especially those native hardwood species that produce nectar and pollen at night time.

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20 Another Perspective - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Australia_DSC0180_edited-1

Visiting a Flying Fox camp even during the day time can be quite a noisy experience as they jostle for position.

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2 Declining Species - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Australia _DSC0004

Grey-headed Flying Fox numbers are declining rapidly.

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3 Species In Decline - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Australia _DSC00010

Grey-headed Flying Fox numbers are declining rapidly.

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5 Environment Our Impact - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Australia _DSC0003

Grey-headed Flying Fox numbers are declining rapidly.

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8 Declining Species Our Impact - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Australia _DSC0008

Grey-headed Flying Fox numbers are declining rapidly.

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9 In Need Of A Hand Up - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Australia _DSC0002

Grey-headed Flying Fox numbers are declining rapidly.

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3 Caught On The Wire - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Environment Our Impact Australia _DSC0079

Grey-headed Flying Fox numbers are declining rapidly. They may be seen electrocuted on powerlines.

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4 Bat On Power Line - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Environment Our Impact Australia _DSC0086

Grey-headed Flying Fox numbers are declining rapidly. They may be seen electrocuted on powerlines.

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5 Bat Electrocuted - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Environment Our Impact Australia _DSC0087

Grey-headed Flying Fox numbers are declining rapidly. They may be seen electrocuted on powerlines.

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6 Electrocuted - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Environment Our Impact Australia _DSC0075

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7 Electrocuted Bat - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Environment Our Impact Australia _DSC0068

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9 No More Power - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Environment Our Impact Australia_DSC0066

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11 Too Much To Bare - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Environment Our Impact Australia _DSC0062

Brisbane is the only city in Australia that supports 3 species of Flying Fox. Grey-headed Flying Fox numbers are declining rapidly. They may be seen electrocuted on powerlines.

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12 Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Environment Our Impact Australia _DSC0082

Brisbane is the only city in Australia that supports 3 species of Flying Fox. Grey-headed Flying Fox numbers are declining rapidly. They may be seen electrocuted on powerlines.

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17 Electrified Bat - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Environment Our Impact Australia _DSC0088

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21 We Benefit They Suffer - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Environment Our Impact Australia _DSC0102

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22 Going Going - Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus – Fauna Environment Our Impact Australia _DSC0103

Brisbane is the only city in Australia that supports 3 species of Flying Fox. Grey-headed Flying Fox numbers are declining rapidly. They may be seen electrocuted on powerlines.

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Back Light - Fauna, Bird, Australia, Osprey, Pandion haliaetus, DSC_1552.jpg

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Back To The Nest - Fauna, Bird, Australia, Osprey, Pandion haliaetus, DSC_0549.jpg

Ospreys build large, basket-like nests of sticks in tall trees.

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Beak In Action - Fauna, Bird, Australia, Osprey, Pandion haliaetus, DSC_0433.jpg

Osprey only feed on fish, hence it is often called fish hawk or fish eagle.

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Fish In Tow - Fauna, Bird, Australia, Osprey, Pandion haliaetus, DSC_1553.jpg

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Head Twist - Fauna, Bird, Australia, Osprey, Pandion haliaetus, DSC_0479.jpg

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No Head - Fauna, Bird, Australia, Osprey, Pandion haliaetus, DSC_0472.jpg

The Osprey feeds only on fish. When seeking its prey the Osprey hovers over the water and dives beneath the surface to capture the fish in its talons.

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Osprey Challenged - Fauna, Bird, Australia, Osprey, Pandion haliaetus, 2, 229.jpg

Ospreys are not popular with some other species of birds and often come under attack. In this instance by Australian crows also known as Torresian crows, Corvus orru.

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Torresian Crow v Osprey - Fauna, Bird, Australia, Osprey, Pandion haliaetus, 2, 224.jpg

Ospreys are not popular with some other species of birds and often come under attack. In this instance by Australian crows also known as Torresian crows, Corvus orru.

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Osprey Under Attack - Fauna, Bird, Australia, Osprey, Pandion haliaetus, 2, 214.jpg

Ospreys are not popular with some other species of birds and often come under attack. In this instance by Australian crows also known as Torresian crows, Corvus orru.

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Osprey Claws Ready - Fauna, Bird,Osprey, Pandion haliaetus, Australia, DSC_0559

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Osprey Ever Alert - Fauna, Bird,Osprey, Pandion haliaetus, Australia, DSC_0562.jpg

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Osprey Fledgling - Fauna, Bird, Australia, Osprey, Pandion haliaetus, DSC_1129.jpg

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Osprey At Nesting Site - Fauna, Bird,Osprey, Australia, Pandion haliaetus, DSC_1249.jpg

Osprey will build nests on electricity pillions especially if they are close to water.

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Osprey's Nesting Site - Fauna, Bird,Osprey, Pandion haliaetus, Australia, DSC_1254.jpg

Osprey will build nests on electricity pillions especially if they are close to water.

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Sharp Eyed Osprey - Fauna, Bird,Osprey, Australia, Pandion haliaetus, DSC_0561.jpg

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I Can't Stop - Fauna, Bird, Australia, Osprey, Pandion haliaetus, 3, 215

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Osprey Feeds 1 - Fauna, Bird, Australia, Osprey, Pandion haliaetus, DSC_0475

Osprey only feed on fish, thus it is often called fish hawk or fish eagle.

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Osprey's Balancing Act 1 - Osprey Claws Ready - Fauna, Bird,Osprey, Australia, Pandion haliaetus, DSC_0560

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The Look From An Osprey 1 - Fauna, Bird, Australia, Osprey, 2, 342

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Going Down _DSC0169 - Fauna, Australia, Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae,

Humpback whales live at the surface of the ocean, and can be found in the open ocean and shallow coastline waters. When not migrating, they prefer shallow waters. They migrate from warm tropical waters where they breed and calve to arctic waters where they eat. Humback Whale may be found in the North Pacific Ocean, North Atlantic Ocean, and the oceans of the Southern Hemisphere. The flukes (tail) are up to 12 feet (3.7 m) wide and have distinctive patches of white on their underside. These markings are unique to each individual whale, like a fingerprint. Humpbacks also stick their tail out of the water into the air, swing it around, and then slap it on the water's surface; this is called lobtailing.

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Whale's Fingerprints _DSC0170 - Fauna, Australia, Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae,

Humpback whales live at the surface of the ocean, and can be found in the open ocean and shallow coastline waters. When not migrating, they prefer shallow waters. They migrate from warm tropical waters where they breed and calve to arctic waters where they eat. Humback Whale may be found in the North Pacific Ocean, North Atlantic Ocean, and the oceans of the Southern Hemisphere. Humpback whales take long seasonal migrations. They mate and calve in tropical waters during the winter and then travel to cold polar waters during the summer to feed. Humpback whales can dive for up to 30 minutes, but usually last only up to 15 minutes. Humpbacks can dive to a depth of 500-700 feet (150-210 m).

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Flukes _DSC0168 - Fauna, Australia, Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae,

Humpback whales are an endangered species. Humpback whales live at the surface of the ocean, and can be found in the open ocean and shallow coastline waters. When not migrating, they prefer shallow waters. They migrate from warm tropical waters where they breed and calve to arctic waters where they eat. Humback Whale may be found in the North Pacific Ocean, North Atlantic Ocean, and the oceans of the Southern Hemisphere. Humpback whales have a life expectancy of 45-50 years.

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In Motion _DSC0200 - Fauna, Australia, Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae,

Humpback whales grow to about 52 feet (16 m) long, weigh approximately 30-50 tons (27-45 tonnes). With females being slightly larger than males.

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Humpback _DSC0156 - Fauna, Australia, Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae,

Humpback whales, Megaptera novaeangliae, are baleen whales and are marine mammals. The name humpback describes the motion it makes as it arches its back out of the water in preparation for a dive. These whales grow to about 52 feet (16 m) long, weigh approximately 30-50 tons (27-45 tonnes). With females being slightly larger than males. They have a small dorsal fin toward the flukes.

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Humpback Calf _DSC0189 - Fauna, Australia, Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae,

Humpback whales, Megaptera novaeangliae, are baleen whales and are marine mammals. The name humpback describes the motion it makes as it arches its back out of the water in preparation for a dive. Humpback whale breeding occurs mostly in the winter to early spring while near the surface and in warm, tropical waters. The gestation period is about 11-12 months and the calf is born tail first and near the surface in warm, shallow waters. The newborn instinctively swims to the surface within 10 seconds for its first breath helped by its mother, using her flippers. Within 30 minutes of its birth the baby whale can swim. The newborn calf is about 14 feet long (4.3 m) and weighs about 2.5 tons (2.3 tonnes). Calves drink 100 pounds of its mother’s milk each day and is weaned in about 11 months. Mother and calf may stay together for over one year. Humpback whales reach puberty at 4-7 years old, and maturity at 15 years.

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Head Up _DSC0177 - Fauna, Australia, Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae,

Humpback whales are an endangered species. Humpback whales take long seasonal migrations. They mate and calve in tropical waters during the winter and then travel to cold polar waters during the summer to feed. Humpback whales filter feed tiny crustaceans, plankton and small fish. An average-sized humpback whale will eat 4,400-5,500 pounds (2000-2500 kg) of plankton, krill and small, schooling fish each day during the feeding season in cold waters (about 120 days). They eat twice a day.

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With Knobs On _DSC0178 - Fauna, Australia, Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae,

Humpback whales are an endangered species. They grow to about 52 feet (16 m) long, weigh approximately 30-50 tons (27-45 tonnes). With females being slightly larger than males. Humpback whales have small, round bumps on the front of the head called knobs or tubercles edging the jaws.

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Flipper _DSC0076 - Fauna, Australia, Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae,

Humpbacks have huge, mottled white flippers with rough edges that are up to one-third of its body length; these are the largest flippers of any whale. The humpback's genus, Megaptera, means "huge-wings," referring to these flippers.

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Backing Down _DSC0092 - Fauna, Australia, Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae,

Humpback whales live at the surface of the ocean, and can be found in the open ocean and shallow coastline waters. When not migrating, they prefer shallow waters. They migrate from warm tropical waters where they breed and calve to arctic waters where they eat. Humback Whale may be found in the North Pacific Ocean, North Atlantic Ocean, and the oceans of the Southern Hemisphere. Humpbacks whales can be very acrobatic, often breaching high out of the water and then slapping the water as they come back down.

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Back Down _DSC0083 - Fauna, Australia, Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae,

Humpback whales grow to about 52 feet (16 m) long, weigh approximately 30-50 tons (27-45 tonnes). With females being slightly larger than males. Humpbacks whales can be very acrobatic, often breaching high out of the water and then slapping the water as they come back down.

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Breaching _DSC0049 - Fauna, Australia, Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae,

Humpback whales are an endangered species. They have a life expectancy of 45-50 years. Mothers and calves have a strong lasting bond. Humpbacks whales can be very acrobatic, often breaching high out of the water and then slapping the water as they come back down.

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Twirl - _DSC0075 2 - Fauna, Australia, Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae,

Humpback whales can dive for up to 30 minutes, but usually last only up to 15 minutes. Humpbacks can dive to a depth of 500-700 feet (150-210 m). They can also be very acrobatic, often breaching high out of the water and then slapping the water as they come back down. Sometimes they twirl around while breaching. Breaching may be purely for play or may be used to loosen skin parasites or have some social meaning.

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Spying _DSC0074 - Fauna, Australia, Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae,

Humpback whales have 14-35 throat grooves that run from the chin to the navel. These grooves allow their throat to expand during the huge intake of water during filter feeding. Humpbacks have huge, mottled white flippers with rough edges that are up to one-third of its body length; these are the largest flippers of any whale. The humpback's genus, Megaptera, means "huge-wings," referring to these flippers. Spyhopping is another humpback activity in which the whale pokes its head out of the water for up to 30 seconds to take a look around.

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Uplift_DSC0055 - Fauna, Australia, Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae,

Humpback whales are an endangered species. They take long seasonal migrations. They mate and calve in tropical waters during the winter and then travel to cold polar waters during the summer to feed. Humpbacks whales can be very acrobatic, often breaching high out of the water and then slapping the water as they come back down.

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From The Depths - _DSC0067 - Fauna, Australia, Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae,

Humpback whales can dive for up to 30 minutes, but usually last only up to 15 minutes. Humpbacks can dive to a depth of 500-700 feet (150-210 m). Humpbacks whales can be very acrobatic, often breaching high out of the water and then slapping the water as they come back down. They have small, round bumps on the front of the head called knobs or tubercles edging the jaws.

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Spouting High _DSC0148 - Fauna, Australia, Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae,

Humpback whales are an endangered species. They are baleen whales and are marine mammals. The name humpback describes the motion it makes as it arches its back out of the water in preparation for a dive. Humpback whales grow to about 52 feet (16 m) long, weigh approximately 30-50 tons (27-45 tonnes). With females being slightly larger than males. They breathe air at the surface of the water through 2 blowholes located near the top of the head. They spout (breathe) about 1-2 times per minute at rest, and 4-8 times per minutes after a deep dive. Their blow is a double stream of spray that rises 10-13 feet (3.1-4 m) above the surface of the water.

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Sign Of Whales _DSC0212 - Fauna, Australia, Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae,

Humpback whales, Megaptera novaeangliae, are baleen whales and are marine mammals. They grow to about 52 feet (16 m) long, weigh approximately 30-50 tons (27-45 tonnes). With females being slightly larger than males. Humpback whales filter feed tiny crustaceans, plankton and small fish. An average-sized humpback whale will eat 4,400-5,500 pounds (2000-2500 kg) of plankton, krill and small, schooling fish each day during the feeding season in cold waters (about 120 days). Eating twice a day. Humpback whales breathe air at the surface of the water through 2 blowholes located near the top of the head. They spout (breathe) about 1-2 times per minute at rest, and 4-8 times per minutes after a deep dive. Their blow is a double stream of spray that rises 10-13 feet (3.1-4 m) above the surface of the water. These whales are an endangered species.

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Young African Elephant - Box 6 File 7 ns 7 30 Fauna Zimbabwe Orphaned Elephant

African Elephant Loxodonta africana. Male elephants are known as ‘bulls’ and the females as ‘cows’ They have no sweat glands, so they cool off by rolling in ponds and streams. The mud that dries on their skin protects it from the sun. African elephants range south of the Sahara, .Elephants life span compares to that of human beings.

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Feeding Time - Box 6 File 7 ns 7 22 Fauna Zimbabwe Orphaned Elephant

An orphaned juvenile African Elephant Loxodonta africana. has to be hand fed.

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Feeding Hands - Box 6 File 7 ns 7 27 Fauna Zimbabwe Orphaned Elephant

An orphaned juvenile African Elephant Loxodonta africana. being hand fed.

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In the Shade - India, Fauna, Horse _DSC4555

As Kolkata swelters horses look far from well as they seek shade from the heat of the midday sun in the Maidan.

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How Long - India, Fauna, Horse _DSC4556

Looking close to collapsing the pony stands in the shade of trees in Kolkata's Maidan

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Hitching A Ride - Fauna - South Island New Zealand - DSC_2854

Perching on the back of a coach this Kea seems content to hitch a ride. The Kea, Nestor notabilis, is a large parrot found in the mountainous regions of New Zealand's South Island.

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Foraging For A Meal - Fauna, New Zealand, South Island, _DSC0043

Rabbits are no strangers to New Zealand's South Island. The long harsh winter can make foraging for food hard work.

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Kea _ Fauna, New Zealand, South Island, _DSC0009

The Kea - Nestor notabills - is a large parrot which lives in the mountainous regions of New Zealand. The Kea's diet consists mainly of insect

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Looking For Food - Fauna, New Zealand, South Island_DSC0042

Rabbits are no strangers to the South Island of New Zealand. The long harsh winter months can make food hard to find.

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Snow Covers food Supply - Fauna, New Zealand, South Island_DSC0046

Rabbits frequent Mount Cook National Park and with much of their food supply covered with snow for many months of the year these rabbits may have to forage long and hard for a food.

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Buttercup - UK - Fauna DSC01201

Pony surrounded by buttercups in a field in rural England.

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Time to Relax - UK - Fauna DSC01226

A swan with cygnets take time to relax on the banks of the Gloucester and Sharpness Canal in England.

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Coloured Chicks - Indonesia, Fauna, TWL _DSC8349

Chicks dyed a variety of bright colours in order to catch the eye at a wildlife market in Indonesia clamour around the food container.

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Colourful Chicks - Indonesia, Fauna, TWL _DSC8348

Brightly coloured chicks at a wildlife market in Indonesia designed to catch the eye.

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