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Annihilation - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2020

Most of the damage was in the area surrounding the epicentre which included the city of Christchurch New Zealand's second-largest urban area with a population of 386,000. Minor damage was reported as far away as Dunedin and Nelson both around 300–350 kilometres from the earthquake's epicentre. A large number of deaths and casualties were reported, along with significant damage to buildings and infrastructure, as a result of the 22 February 2011 aftershock.

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Amongst The Rubble - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2049

On September 4th at 4.35 am NZST an earthquake struck in the Canterbury region on New Zealand’s South Island measuring 7.1 magnitude. This earthquake caused widespread damage particularly in the city of Christchurch, New Zealand's second largest city. Mass fatalities were avoided by and large because the quake occurred during the night time when most people were at home. The earthquake's epicentre was 48 kilometres west of Christchurch at a depth of 10 km. The initial earthquake lasted about 40 seconds and was felt widely across the South Island, and in the North Island as far north as New Plymouth. Aftershocks continued into 2011, with some causing significant damage. The strongest to date occurred on 22 February 2011 with an estimated magnitude of 6.3. This caused widespread damage partculaly in the city of Christchurch CBD and the eastern suburbs. The number of fatalities were alarming with 181 people confirmed dead.

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All Affected - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3442

On September 4th at 4.35 am NZST an earthquake struck in the Canterbury region on New Zealand’s South Island measuring 7.1 magnitude. This earthquake caused widespread damage particularly in the city of Christchurch, New Zealand's second largest city. Many of the most badly affected structures in both Christchurch and the surrounding districts were older buildings.

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All Shaken - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3369

On September 4th at 4.35 am NZST an earthquake struck in the Canterbury region on New Zealand’s South Island measuring 7.1 magnitude. Aftershocks continued into 2011, with some causing significant damage. The strongest to date occurred on 22 February 2011 with an estimated magnitude of 6.3. This caused widespread damage partculaly in the city of Christchurch CBD and the eastern suburbs. The number of fatalities were alarming with 181 people confirmed dead.

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Cracking Up - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2044

Liquefaction was significantly greater than the 2010 earthquake, causing the upwelling of more than 200,000 tonnes of silt which needed to be cleared. The increased liquefaction caused significant ground movement, undermining many foundations and destroying infrastructure, damage which "may be the greatest ever recorded anywhere in a modern city". 80% of the water and sewerage system was severely damaged.

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Collapsed - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2018

Whilst the 2010 earthquake was more energetic, it struck in the early hours of the morning, some 48km outside the city. The quake that hit on Tuesday 22nd Febuary 2011was more devastating for several reasons: it was shallower, much closer to Christchurch and arrived in the middle of local lunchtime at 12.51pm. Earthquakes are not rare in New Zealand. The islands are shaken by noticeable tremors on average twice every three days. Seismologists at the US Geological Survey have recorded at least six earthquakes of magnitude five or more since September's magnitude 7 incident.

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Demolished - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2034

The earthquake, or aftershock, that affected New Zealand South Island on 22nd February 2011was magnitude 6.3 and struck at a depth of 5km just 10km south-east of Christchurch CBD at 12.51pm NZST. It was shallower and closer to Christchurch than the 7.1 magnitude earthquake on September 4th 2011, which was recorded at a depth of 10km, near Darfield, about 48km from the city of Christchurch.

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Determination - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2031

In total, 181 people were killed in the earthquake or aftershock, making it the second-deadliest natural disaster recorded in New Zealand . The 1931 Hawke’s Bay being the worst to date. At 5 pm local time on the day of the disaster Radio New Zealand reported that 80% of the city had no power. Water and wastewater services have been disrupted throughout the city, with authorities urging residents to conserve water and collect rainwater. Power had been restored to 82% households within five days and to 95% within two weeks. Generators were donated, and telephone companies established emergency communications and free calls. Water provision was worked on by companies and contractors, with the Army providing desalination plants, and bottled supplies sent in by volunteers and companies. Mains water supply was reestablished to 70% households within one week.

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Exposed - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2069

This earthquake caused widespread damage particularly in the city of Christchurch, New Zealand's second largest city. Many of the most badly affected structures in both Christchurch and the surrounding districts were older buildings.

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Destructive Force - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2023

Although smaller in magnitude than the 2010 quake, the Febuary 2011 event was more damaging and deadly for a number of reasons including - the epicentre was closer to Christchurch, and shallower just 5 kilometres underground compared to 10 km and the epicentre 48 km away in the September 2010 earthquake.

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Health And Safety - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3436

Three Geonet monitors in the Christchurch CBD recorded much worse ground shaking in the February 22nd 2011 aftershock than was felt during the original September 4th 2010 earthquake.

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Behind Bars - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2055

A large number of deaths and casualties were reported, along with significant damage to buildings and infrastructure, as a result of the 22 February 2011 aftershock. The 6.3 earthquake or aftershock was part of a series of earthquakes and aftershocks in the region following the 7.1-magnitude 4 September 2010 earthquake. Whilst New Zealand's scientists describe the 22nd Febuary 2011 event as "technically an aftershock" of the earlier September 4th 2010 earthquake other seismologists, including those from USA and Australia consider it a separate event, given its location on a separate fault system

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Civil Defence - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2064

At 5 pm local time on the day of the disaster Radio New Zealand reported that 80% of the city had no power. Water and wastewater services have been disrupted throughout the city, with authorities urging residents to conserve water and collect rainwater. Waste water and sewerage systems had been severely damaged, so households had to establish emergency latrines. Over 2000 portaloos and 5,000 chemical toilets from throughout New Zealand and overseas were brought in, with 20,000 more chemical toilets placed on order from the manufacturers.

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Destroyed and Unscathed - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2068

The quake badly affected the city of Christchurch CBD and eastern suburbs causing many fatalities, serious injuries and extensive structural damage to buildings. Many of the most badly affected structures in both Christchurch and the surrounding districts were older buildings. Christchurch Cathedral, which had survived the original 2010 September 4th earthquake did not survive the 2011 February 22nd aftershock, it collapsed. September 2010 New Zealand South Island earthquake was more energetic, but caused less damage than that which occurred on 22nd February

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Inconvenience - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2021

Waste water and sewerage systems had been severely damaged, so households had to establish emergency latrines. Over 2000 portaloos and 5,000 chemical toilets from throughout New Zealand and overseas were brought in, with 20,000 more chemical toilets placed on order from the manufacturers.

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Left Standing - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2050

Although smaller in magnitude than the 2010 quake, the Febuary 2011 event was more damaging and deadly for a number of reasons including - the epicentre was closer to Christchurch, and shallower just 5 kilometres underground compared to 10 km and the epicentre 48 km away in the September 2010 earthquake. The February 2011 earthquake occurred on a weekday during the lunchtime period when the CBD was very busy. Also many buildings had already been weakened from the previous earthquakes and aftershocks. The peak ground accearation (PGA) was extremely high, and with simultaneous vertical and horizontal ground movement it was "almost impossible" for buildings to survive intact.

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Deserted City - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3399

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Destroyed - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2017

The quake badly affected the city of Christchurch CBD and eastern suburbs causing many fatalities, serious injuries and extensive structural damage to buildings.

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How Long - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3428

Following inspection many heritage buildings in Christchurch were given red stickers. With approximately one thousand of the 4000 buildings within the city of Christchurch’s Four Avenues expected to be demolished. Raising the question as to how long will it take before life gets back to normal?

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Inclining - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3378

Liquefaction was significantly greater in the 22nd February 2011 aftershock than the 4th September 2010 earthquake, causing the upwelling of more than 200,000 tonnes of silt which needed to be cleared. The increased liquefaction caused significant ground movement, undermining many foundations and destroying infrastructure, damage which "may be the greatest ever recorded anywhere in a modern city". 80% of the water and sewerage system was severely damaged.

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Life Goes On - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3394

In total, 181 people were killed in the earthquake, making the earthquake the second-deadliest natural disaster recorded in New Zealand . The 1931 Hawke’s Bay being the worst to date. At 5 pm local time on the day of the disaster Radio New Zealand reported that 80% of the city had no power. Water and wastewater services have been disrupted throughout the city, with authorities urging residents to conserve water and collect rainwater.

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Grim Reminder - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3441

Most of the damage was in the area surrounding the epicentre which included the city of Christchurch New Zealand's second-largest urban area with a population of 386,000. Minor damage was reported as far away as Dunedin and Nelson both around 300–350 kilometres from the earthquake's epicentre.

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Grief For Many - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3395

A large number of deaths and casualties were reported, along with significant damage to buildings and infrastructure, as a result of the 22 February 2011 aftershock. In total, 181 people were killed making it the second-deadliest natural disaster recorded in New Zealand . The 1931 Hawke’s Bay being the worst to date.

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Restoration In Progress - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3404

Workmen set about the seemingly endless task of removing tonnes of rubble – all that remains of the many badly damaged buildings in the city of Christchurch.

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Collection - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3421

Whilst the 2010 earthquake was more energetic, it struck in the early hours of the morning, some 48km outside the city. The quake that hit on Tuesday 22nd Febuary 2011 was more devastating for several reasons: it was shallower, much closer to Christchurch and arrived in the middle of local lunchtime at 12.51pm. In total, 181 people were killed in the earthquake, making the earthquake the second-deadliest natural disaster recorded in New Zealand . The 1931 Hawke’s Bay being the worst to date. Recovery is underway, but it seems slow progress.

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Labour Intensive - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3405

In the city of Christchurch CBD restoration seems to be slow to progress as rubble is sifted through for material that can be re-cycled.

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Recycling - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3422

Restoration in progress - both time consuming and labour intensive as workmen sift through the tonnes of rubble in search of material to re-cycle.

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Time Consuming - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3420

Restoration in progress - time consuming and labour intensive as workmen sift through the tonnes of rubble in search of material to re-cycle

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Reclaiming - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3419

Workmen sift through the tonnes of rubble in search of material to re-cycle.

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Recovery - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2063

Now the painstaking task of salvaging material and reconstructing buildings takes place.

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Resurrection - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2062

The church spire lies on the roadside waiting to be place back into position having been dislodged during the 2011 aftershock which struck the city of Christchurch on New Zealand’s South Island.

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Desalination - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2067

At 5 pm local time on the day of the disaster Radio New Zealand reported that 80% of the city had no power. Water and wastewater services have been disrupted throughout the city, with authorities urging residents to conserve water and collect rainwater. Power had been restored to 82% households within five days and to 95% within two weeks. Generators were donated, and telephone companies established emergency communications and free calls. Water provision was worked on by companies and contractors, with the Army providing desalination plants, and bottled supplies sent in by volunteers and companies. Mains water supply was reestablished to 70% households within one week.

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Water treatment - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2066

At 5 pm local time on the day of the disaster Radio New Zealand reported that 80% of the city had no power. Water and wastewater services have been disrupted throughout the city, with authorities urging residents to conserve water and collect rainwater. Power had been restored to 82% households within five days and to 95% within two weeks. Generators were donated, and telephone companies established emergency communications and free calls. Water provision was worked on by companies and contractors, with the Army providing desalination plants, and bottled supplies sent in by volunteers and companies. Mains water supply was reestablished to 70% households within one week.

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Safety First - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3374

Safety a concern long after the earthquake stuck as aftershocks continue and new damage appears.

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New Angle - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3366

Liquefaction was significantly greater in the 22nd February 2011 aftershock than the 4th September 2010 earthquake, causing the upwelling of more than 200,000 tonnes of silt which needed to be cleared. The increased liquefaction caused significant ground movement, undermining many foundations and destroying infrastructure, damage which "may be the greatest ever recorded anywhere in a modern city". 80% of the water and sewerage system was severely damaged. At 5 pm local time on the day of the disaster Radio New Zealand reported that 80% of the city had no power. Water and wastewater services have been disrupted throughout the city, with authorities urging residents to conserve water and collect rainwater. Power had been restored to 82% households within five days and to 95% within two weeks. Generators were donated, and telephone companies established emergency communications and free calls. Water provision was worked on by companies and contractors, with the Army providing desalination plants, and bottled supplies sent in by volunteers and companies. Mains water supply was re-established to 70% households within one week.

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Unoccupied - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3432

Many residences remain unoccupied long after the event. Having been inspected and their structure being deemed unsafe for habitation.

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Violently Shaken - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2060

The earthquake, or aftershock, that affected New Zealand South Island on 22nd February 2011was magnitude 6.3 and struck at a depth of 5km just 10km south-east of Christchurch CBD at 12.51pm NZST. It was shallower and closer to Christchurch than the 7.1 magnitude earthquake on September 4th 2011, which was recorded at a depth of 10km, near Darfield, about 48km from the city of Christchurch. The quake badly affected the city of Christchurch CBD and eastern suburbs causing many fatalities, serious injuries and extensive structural damage to buildings.

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Steady - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3388

At 5 pm local time on the day of the disaster Radio New Zealand reported that 80% of the city had no power. Water and wastewater services have been disrupted throughout the city, with authorities urging residents to conserve water and collect rainwater. Power had been restored to 82% households within five days and to 95% within two weeks. Generators were donated, and telephone companies established emergency communications and free calls.

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Power - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage DSC_2039

On September 4th at 4.35 am NZST an earthquake struck in the Canterbury region on New Zealand’s South Island measuring 7.1 magnitude. This earthquake caused widespread damage particularly in the city of Christchurch, New Zealand's second largest city. Mass fatalities were avoided by and large because the quake occurred during the night time when most people were at home.

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Up Or Down - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3379

Liquefaction was significantly greater in the 22nd February 2011 aftershock than the 4th September 2010 earthquake, causing the upwelling of more than 200,000 tonnes of silt which needed to be cleared. The increased liquefaction caused significant ground movement, undermining many foundations and destroying infrastructure, damage which "may be the greatest ever recorded anywhere in a modern city". 80% of the water and sewerage system was severely damaged.

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Some Spared - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3396

Many of the most badly affected structures in both Christchurch and the surrounding districts were older buildings. Some buildings survived even though in close proximity to building which had been destroyed.

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Stress Relief - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2071

Immediately after the 22nd February 2011 aftershock between 1,500 and 2,000 people were treated for minor injuries, and Christchurch Hospital alone treated 220 major trauma cases connected to the quake.

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So Much Tragedy - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3370

The headstone reveals that the family must have gone through a great deal of grief only to be ‘shaken’ again almost 150 years later.

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Silence - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3433

Some areas have an eerie silence seeming to indicate that the neighbour hood has become devoid of human occupation.

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Toppled - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3435

Even buildings with minor structural damage remain a safety concern.

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Sinking Feeling - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3391

Liquefaction was significantly greater in the 22nd February 2011 aftershock than the 4th September 2010 earthquake, causing the upwelling of more than 200,000 tonnes of silt which needed to be cleared. The increased liquefaction caused significant ground movement, undermining many foundations and destroying infrastructure, damage which "may be the greatest ever recorded anywhere in a modern city". 80% of the water and sewerage system was severely damaged.

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Left Exposed - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3383

On September 4th at 4.35 am NZST an earthquake struck in the Canterbury region on New Zealand’s South Island measuring 7.1 magnitude. Aftershocks continued into 2011, with some causing significant damage. The strongest to date occurred on 22 February 2011 with an estimated magnitude of 6.3.

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Nothing Spared - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3371

In total, 181 people were killed in the earthquake, making the earthquake the second-deadliest natural disaster recorded in New Zealand. Although smaller in magnitude than the 2010 earthquake, the Febuary 2011 event was more damaging and deadly for a number of reasons including - the epicentre was closer to Christchurch, and shallower just 5 kilometres underground compared to 10 km and the epicentre 48 km away in the September 2010 earthquake. The February 2011 earthquake occurred on a weekday during the lunchtime period when the CBD was very busy. Also many buildings had already been weakened from the previous earthquakes and aftershocks. The peak ground accearation (PGA) was extremely high, and with simultaneous vertical and horizontal ground movement it was "almost impossible" for buildings to survive intact.

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Natural Disaster - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2033

Although smaller in magnitude than the 2010 earthquake, the Febuary 2011 event was more damaging and deadly for a number of reasons including - the epicentre was closer to Christchurch, and shallower just 5 kilometres underground compared to 10 km and the epicentre 48 km away in the September 2010 earthquake. The February 2011 earthquake occurred on a weekday during the lunchtime period when the CBD was very busy. Also many buildings had already been weakened from the previous earthquakes and aftershocks. The peak ground accearation (PGA) was extremely high, and with simultaneous vertical and horizontal ground movement it was "almost impossible" for buildings to survive intact.

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Living Amongst The Destruction - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3393

In total, 181 people were killed in the earthquake, making the earthquake the second-deadliest natural disaster recorded in New Zealand . The 1931 Hawke’s Bay being the worst to date. Most of the damage was in the area surrounding the epicentre which included the city of Christchurch New Zealand's second-largest urban area with a population that was approximately 386,000. Minor damage was reported as far away as Dunedin and Nelson both around 300–350 kilometres from the earthquake's epicentre.

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Now What - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3397

Many of the most badly affected structures in both Christchurch and the surrounding districts were older buildings. Only time will tell as to what will occur for those affected by these tragic events.

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Leaning Of The lamp Post - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3375

Three Geonet monitors in the Christchurch CBD recorded much worse ground shaking in the February 22nd 2011 aftershock than was felt during the original September 4th 2010 earthquake. Liquefaction was significantly greater in the 22nd February 2011 aftershock than the 4th September 2010 earthquake, causing the upwelling of more than 200,000 tonnes of silt which needed to be cleared. The increased liquefaction caused significant ground movement, undermining many foundations and destroying infrastructure, damage which "may be the greatest ever recorded anywhere in a modern city". 80% of the water and sewerage system was severely damaged.

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Magnitude - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_3373

On September 4th at 4.35 am NZST an earthquake struck in the Canterbury region on New Zealand’s South Island measuring 7.1 magnitude. This earthquake caused widespread damage particularly in the city of Christchurch, New Zealand's second largest city. Mass fatalities were avoided by and large because the earthquake occurred during the night time when most people were at home. The earthquake's epicentre was 48 kilometres west of Christchurch at a depth of 10 km. The initial earthquake lasted about 40 seconds and was felt widely across the South Island, and in the North Island as far north as New Plymouth. Aftershocks continued into 2011, with some causing significant damage. The strongest to date occurred on 22 February 2011 with an estimated magnitude of 6.3. This caused widespread damage partculaly in the city of Christchurch CBD and the eastern suburbs. The number of fatalities were alarming with 181 people confirmed dead.

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Devastation - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2022

The February 22nd 201 aftershock badly affected the city of Christchurch CBD and eastern suburbs causing many fatalities, serious injuries and extensive structural damage to buildings.

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Shaken and Stirred - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2043

A grim reminder - just as if time had stood still with items still remaining where they fell the moment the earthquake struck. Whilst buildings reflected in the window remain in tact.

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Struck Down - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2057

The earthquake or aftershock badly affected the city of Christchurch CBD and eastern suburbs causing many fatalities, serious injuries and extensive structural damage to buildings.

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When Will It Open - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2052

With so much devastation only time will tell as to when the city of Christchurch and its suburbs will be back to a desirable area to live and work in.

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Powerful Force - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2042

On September 4th at 4.35 am NZST an earthquake struck in the Canterbury region on New Zealand’s South Island measuring 7.1 magnitude. This earthquake caused widespread damage particularly in the city of Christchurch, New Zealand's second largest city. Mass fatalities were avoided by and large because the quake occurred during the night time when most people were at home. The earthquake's epicentre was 48 kilometres west of Christchurch at a depth of 10 km. The initial earthquake lasted about 40 seconds and was felt widely across the South Island, and in the North Island as far north as New Plymouth. Aftershocks continued into 2011, with some causing significant damage.

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Destruction - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2016

Although smaller in magnitude than the 2010 quake, the Febuary 2011 event was more damaging and deadly for a number of reasons including - the epicentre was closer to Christchurch, and shallower just 5 kilometres underground compared to 10 km and the epicentre 48 km away in the September 2010 earthquake. The February 2011 earthquake occurred on a weekday during the lunchtime period when the CBD was very busy. Also many buildings had already been weakened from the previous earthquakes and aftershocks. The peak ground accearation (PGA) was extremely high, and with simultaneous vertical and horizontal ground movement it was "almost impossible" for buildings to survive intact.

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Moment In Time - New Zealand, Christchurch, Earthquake, Reportage, DSC_2026

Between 1,500 and 2,000 people were treated for minor injuries, and Christchurch Hospital alone treated 220 major trauma cases connected to the quake. Earthquakes and aftershocks may last a relativily short period of time, but their destructive power can have an effect that may a generation or more.

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